Who’s Afraid of IPA’s?

Kevin Brooks is a cheesemonger and self-proclaimed beer geek. This Saturday he’ll be leading a seminar at the Craft Beer Festival in NYC. The beers in this post are all available at Murray’s on Bleecker Street.

IPAs are intimidating.

It’s true. Big, strong and intensely bitter, IPAs are the beer that lets hops shine. Stinking of citrus and pine, they explode on the palate and, if you’re not used to it, they can really scare you off. I remember once in my callow youth when I left most of a pint of Sierra Nevada sitting on the bar, possibly thinking, “that was gross, it probably went bad.” Oh foolish past me!

The granddaddy of IPAs was developed in Burton on Trent in the 1800s. At the time, the British were having difficulties delivering beer to colonies in India.  A long hot sea voyage wasn’t good for the beer, and it was arriving spoiled and useless. Knowing of hops’ preservative qualities and that a stronger beer would be better suited to the trip, brew masters upped the amount of hops they added to the beer, resulting in a strongly bitter brew. It was pale ale destined for India, so they called it India Pale Ale, or an IPA. The name stuck.

There is a massive range of flavors and aromas in the world of hops, and brewers continue to find new ways to unlock ever more bitter and intense brews. Dry-hopping, wet-hopping, hop backs, double hopping, continuous hopping, bar-side hop infusers, all working to wrest more flavor and aroma out of this humble flower. Some hops are added for bitterness, some for flavor, some for aroma, and different kinds of hops are added at different parts of the boil. It’s all very involved.

To ease into the world of hops, I’ve selected three beers that raise us up through levels of intensity. So starting off we have an English IPA, Coniston Brewery’s Bluebird Bitter. English IPAs are milder than their American cousins; they’re hopped less, and English hops are milder, more floral, and less assertive than American hops. They also have cute names like Fuggle. Bluebird stands as a very drinkable, well balanced ale with a sweet backbone, lovely floral aromas, and light bitterness. I like this one paired with a mellow English cheddar with a similarly silly name, Tickler Cheddar!

Next up was an emblematic American IPA, Green Flash’s West Coast IPA. American hops tend to be more towards the piney and citric side of things, and American brewers tend to throw a whole lot more of them into the kettle, making for much bigger, more hop forward beers. The West Coast IPA smells like fresh cut grapefruits in the middle of a pine forest, while the flavor is big and citrusy, but still balanced, with a lingering bitterness to let you know what you are drinking. It’s also a touch stronger, at 7.2% abv, so be warned. For cheese picks, this is amazing with the hops-coated Cavemaster Reserve Hudson Flower.

And now for the bitterest of the bitter, an Imperial IPA. Imperial is a bit of a buzzword in brewing these days, and generally just means “more”, as in “more hops, more booze, more flavor.” Southern Tier’s Unearthly Imperial IPA is no joke, and one of my favorites. Enormously bitter, but with a big malt backbone supporting it, making for an eye-watering, yet still drinkable beer. But Murray’s doesn’t have the standard Unearthly; we carry the Oak Aged Unearthly, which has spent the better part of a year chilling in an oak barrel.

What a difference a year (trapped in a barrel) makes! As beer ages, hop flavor and aroma is the first thing to fade. First the aromas fade to nothing, then the flavors dwindle, leaving behind just the characteristic bitterness. The Oak Aged Unearthly has mellowed out considerably. No piney, no citrus, just a big chewy bitterness that isn’t overwhelming. And when you take a big, balanced IPA and remove the hop character, you’re left with a big, sweet, malty beer. The level of caramelly sweetness is really surprising, and so is how well it pairs with some Mast Bros. Sea Salt chocolate. Who would have thought you could drink an IPA with dessert?

Are IPAs intimidating? Sure. But as with anything else, if you give it half a chance, you’ll find some real pleasant surprises in there.

Cheese & Bourbon Tasting in Louisville, Kentucky!

Cheese & Bourbon Tasting with Murray’s Cheese & Maker’s Mark in Louisville

On Monday,  Murray’s is heading to Louisville to kick off our newest cheese counter opening in Kroger. We can’t wait! We’ve been working hard with Maker’s Mark to bring Louisvillians an exciting night filled with unique cheese & bourbon pairings at the lovely 21C Hotel. As an added bonus, Proof on Main will be serving up tasty bites for party goers. Cheese, bourbon, and delicious Southern snacks?! We’re in heaven.

$10 donation tickets are available at www.murrayscheese.brownpapertickets.com and all ticket sales benefit Louisville’s Dare to Care Food Bank.

Event Details

Monday, November 12 from 6-8pm

21C Hotel, 700 West Main Street, Louisville, KY 40202

 


Murray’s Gets A Makeover! Meet the new murrayscheese.com…

Cheeselovers, rejoice! It’s the all new Murray’s Cheese website! We’ve got to say, we think it turned out pretty great.

Take a few minutes to browse the site and see what’s new and improved, and don’t miss out on this awesomeness:

– AMAZING new photos and a zoom feature. [Caution: screen-licking may occur]

-Easier browsing and better searching

– An easy to use “drag and drop” build your own gift tool

– An updated pairing guide so you’ll know what cheese to enjoy with that special bottle you’ve been saving.

– A virtual cheese counter – get recommendations to find the perfect cheese!

– A new learn about cheese section with everything you’d ever want to know about cheese.

All new gifts for the upcoming holidays

– Cheesemaker profiles so you know the story behind every wheel

– You can leave product reviews now!

Oh, and our blog has a fresh new look! We’ll be posting cheesy news here on the regular, so come back soon to see what’s cooking at Murray’s.

We hope you like it! Share your favorite photos or features on facebook or twitter, we love to hear from you!

 

Creamy Mac & Cheese For Kids

Kids tend to like the boxed stuff, but this version will win them over with gooey goodness (and none of the yucky processed stuff). Fresh grated Parmigiano Reggiano makes this a dish grown-ups will love, too!

 

INGREDIENTS

Directions

  1. Bring 2 quarts of water to boil in large pot. Add salt and pasta. Cook pasta al dente following manufacturer’s instructions. Drain pasta, then pour onto a large lipped baking sheet to cool and prevent sticking while preparing sauce.
  2. Lightly heat the milk and broth in a sauce pan. Melt butter in the empty pasta pot; whisk in flour, followed by warm milk mixture. Continue to whisk until thick and bubbly, 3 to 4 minutes. Whisk in mustard & Parmigiano. Turn off heat, stir in grated Gouda until melted.
  3. Add drained pasta to sauce, and stir until everything is well combined over low heat. Stir to heat through, and thin with a little water if the sauce is too thick. Serve hot.

Parmigiano Reggiano “Frico Flats”

These little savory bites take only three ingredients and a few minutes to make. Delicious as a snack or alongside soup – eat with caution, these crisps are addictively tasty!

image via Gourmet.com

(Makes about 20)

INGREDIENTS

3/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano

1/4 cup plain flour

Ground black pepper

 

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Finely grate the Parmigiano Reggiano and set aside.

In a small bowl, toss together the cheese and flour and season with up to a 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper, depending on your taste.

On a sheet pan lined with a nonstick liner or parchment paper, mound a rounded tablespoon of the mixture spaced a few inches apart.

Bake for 8 – 10 minutes. Remove from the sheet pan while still warm and allow to cool slightly.

 

Find more recipes on the Parmigiano Reggiano Consortium website.