Pimento Cheese That’s Sure to Please

PimentoCheeseSpread_blog

Y’all, sometimes there ain’t nothin’ better than a big ol’ dollop of pimento cheese on a nice hearty cracker. We love this stuff because it’s easy to make, and it gets gobbled up at any gathering. Alternatively, it makes for excellent snacking for those solo nights at home binge watching Netflix. Channel your inner Paula Deen, and give this Murray’s recipe a try to put a lil’ South in your mouth!

pimento_blogIngredients:

½ lb Tickler Cheddar, shredded
¾ cup mayonnaise
½ cup Greek-style yogurt
¼ cup Peppadews, minced
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon onion powder
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Directions:

1. Fold all ingredients together in a mixing bowl until well incorporated.
2. Enjoy with crackers, baguette or your favorite raw vegetables.

 

A World Of Cheese

We know that the world of cheese can be pretty daunting: so many different styles and types, not to mention different countries of origin. This nifty map from Smithsonian  is an amazing tool to help discover the world of cheese, for novice and curd nerds alike! While it’s no surprise that France is the largest consumer of cheese, did you know that the US is by far the largest producer!? In Mauritania, Camel cheese is all the rage, while in the Philippines, fresh Buffalo milk is the curd of choice. You learn something new every day!

Via Smithsonian Magazine 

A Whey Better Hangover Cure

hangover blog

We’ve all been there, keeled over in a pool of our own regret, shame, and poor decisions. A debaucherous lifestyle comes with a hefty price tag. Working in the cheese biz, we’ve known for a long time that a little hunk of queso can do wonders for the wrath of the worst hangover, and the fine folks at Vice explain why cheese makes such a great hangover cure:

Cheese is filled with all kinds of great things: calcium, enzymes, protein; it has the incredible property to coat things, so it soothes your tummy. Cheese is made of milk, and milk is good for you (it helps strengthen your bones and all that jazz). Good quality dairy comes from happy animals whose rich, liquid lovin’ is the base of the best stuff out there. Cows give forth some incredibly buttery and sweet milk, so cheese developed from cow’s milk can become all nutty and caramel-y. Think aged Gruyere or Comté. Goats have that lush, tangy, slightly barny milk that can develop into a rich, petting-zoo-esque floral creation like the famed Crottin or St. Maure. Sheep have the fattiest and flintiest milk out there and can create some great, wooly, slightly floral treats like the incredible Abbaye de Belloc or Ossau Iraty. Buffalo give forth a yogurt-y, tangy, ultra fatty milk that screams to be pulled out into some fresh mozzarella, all creamy and seductive.

So, next Saturday morning when you’re trying to piece together the long string of mistakes you made the night before, get down to Murray’s and grab yourself a wedge. We get it, you’re hungover…we probably are, too.

Via Vice

Macking with Murray’s: Murray’s Classic Mac & Cheese Recipe

Murray's Classic Mac

In our search for the elixir of life—AKA the perfect mac and cheese—we’ve tasted many-a recipe, and to paraphrase those Brooklyn bards, the Beastie Boys, we’ve been “working harder than ever, and you can call it macking.” At long last, our cheese alchemy has led us to THE ONE: a recipe we can’t keep secret, a dish so perfectly balanced and proportioned we must share it with you immediately!

#murraysmac

Murray’s Classic Mac & Cheese

Yield
Serves 6-8

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces Fontina Val d’Aosta, grated
  • 8 ounces Spring Brook Reading, grated
  • 6 ounces Comte St. Antoine, grated
  • 2 ounces Cabot Cheddar, finely grated
  • 1 half onion, skin removed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 quart milk
  • 8 tablespoons butter
  • ½ clove garlic, grated
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 pound elbow macaroni
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup Panko breadcrumbs
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme, minced
  • Zest of 1 lemon

Directions
1. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Cut a slit into the halved onion and place a bay leaf in the slit. Stick the 2 cloves into the onion. Placing the milk in a saucepan over medium low heat and add the onion.

3. In a separate saucepan, make a Mornay sauce: melt 5 tablespoons butter and add the grated garlic. Slowly add the flour, whisking to combine, and cook for 2 minutes. Remove the onion from the warm milk and discard. Ladle in the warm milk to the butter and flour mixture (called a “roux”), whisking constantly, until combined and smooth. Add the nutmeg, black pepper, and cayenne pepper. Add 5 ounces Fontina Val d’Aosta and 5 ounces Spring Brook Reading. Then add 3 ounces Comte St. Antoine and whisk until well combined.

4. In a large pot, bring water to a boil and add salt. Add the macaroni and cook until al dente. Strain the macaroni and place into a bowl. Add the remaining grated cheeses and toss to combine.

5. Pour the Mornay sauce over the macaroni and toss to combine. In a small sauté pan, melt 3 tablespoons butter and add the Panko breadcrumbs, thyme, and lemon zest. Place the combined macaroni and cheese into a shallow baking dish and top with the breadcrumbs. Bake for 20 minutes and serve right away.

frozen_mac_and_cheese

Not in the mood to cook? Check out our prepared mac and cheese, which comes in three insanely delicious flavors: classic plain, basil artichoke, and pulled pork. We’ll deliver dinner straight to your door…all you need to do it heat it in the oven and enjoy. Click here to shop Murray’s prepared mac and cheese.

Aging Gracefully: Growing Mold in the Cheese Caves

cave blog

By: Lizzie Roller

Most people know that Murray’s has caves where we age a wide variety of cheeses. But we would bet that only a few people really know what’s going on back there. So we talked to the man behind the curtain: Brian. He’s our cavemaster, and he’s here to tell you a little bit more about Murray’s caves, the 3 most important types of mold, and why patience is the greatest  of all virtues (when it comes to aging cheese, that is).

 Mold and Bacteria Farmers

Meet Brian, Murray’s Cavemaster—or, in his words—a mold and bacteria farmer. His day consists of a lot of ritual, mostly comprised of repetitive tasks that are a mix of old-world traditions and modern technology. Brian’s primary job is to maintain the cheese at its highest level. This encompasses patting and flipping the bloomies, washing the alpines and stinkers, flipping and brushing the natural rinds and, in general, cleaning the space and making sure everything is in tip top form. The timing of all of these activities is super important as well. The end goal of all these tasks is to keep the rinds happy, which is not as simple as it might seem.

Sporendonema CaseiSupercalifragilisticexpialidocious
Sadly this is not an actual type of mold. But there are tons of different molds that make up the micro flora of our caves: Sporendonema Casei, Chrysosporium Sulfereum and Geotrichum Candidum are just a few that help make our cheeses what they are. We dare you to say all of those five times fast! Brian’s favorite, the S. Casei, is a naturally occurring mold that is bright orange and brings with it flavors of damp forest and fresh mushroom.

Sci-art!
Brian stresses that affinage (the technical and French word for the aging or refining of cheeses) is a balancing act between art and science…or sciart. Brian explains that tasting the developing flavors all day and associating them to molecules and compounds can be very interesting. But at the end of the day you want to be moved by the product both emotionally and intellectually.

Playing Favorites
While most mongers would claim picking a favorite cheese to be a super hard task, our cave guru was able to make it happen. Brian equates this task to picking a favorite child…aaaaaand then he proclaimed that Greensward (our Cavemaster Reserve cheese created especially for New York City restaurant Eleven Madison Park) had stolen his heart. He loves it for the texture, flavor, and complexity. As he says, “his cheese is not only fantastic by itself, but can make any pairing look and taste good. Emotionally, working with it has had its up and downs, but totally worth it!”

natural rind caveMy Day Job is Real, Darn it!
We asked Brian about misconceptions people have with their jobs, and he pointed to the issue of affinage. What’s the issue of affinage? Brian explained that to him, a cheese cave should be built with the intention of a) maturing a product from a young age until it is almost ready for sale or b) enhancing the overall quality of the product if it already is somewhat matured. He explains that “the reality is that some caves are better set ups than others; some people say they have caves but are really just show rooms.”

Soooooo, What Do You Do?
Reactions when these Brian explains his job to others run from the mundane (“Cool…”) to the absurd (“So, you’re like a Cheese Warden? Like, you fondle rinds all day?”).

Above All Else
Working in the caves is a workout, a physically demanding job that at the end of the day leaves you reeking of cheese (Wondering what that smells is on the subway? Stop looking around, it’s you). But the one thing Brian says is the most important, as well as the hardest part of the his job, can be summed up in one word: PATIENCE.