Visitor Monitoring
Close
We’ll keep you in the loop on new cheese & deals!
And we’ll never sell or share your info.
Cart(0)
888-692-4339

Cashel Blue

$24.99/LB
Kicked out of England 300 years ago for religious differences, the Grubbs packed up and took to milling and buttermaking practices in County Tipperary, Ireland, where to this day Louis and Jane still keep the family's dairy traditions alive. In the mid 1980's, they developed the first Irish Blue, nurtured and exported by Neal's Yard Dairy. Cashel is made with the milk of the Grubbs' 110 Friesian cows, pasteurized, and ripened for two and up to six months. It maintains a unique, voluptuous, creamy texture with a minerally undertone complemented by a delightful, mild blue tang. The best cheeses are made from April to October when the cows are out to pasture.

Just the facts

Country United Kingdom and Ireland
Region County Tipperary
Milk Type Cow
Pasteurization Pasteurized
Rennet Type Microbial
Age 2-4 months
Cheese Type Blue
Wheel Weight 3 lbs.
Pairing Recommendations

Pour a glass of...

  • Pinot Noir

    Lighter bodied and delicate. Old World style generally offers more funk, New World more fruit.

    Old World Pinot: Flavors of fresh cherries and raspberry balanced by a barnyard funk and high minerality. Sometimes has floral aromas, reminiscent of rose petal.
    Pair with: Almost anything! Works with funky Frenchies Epoisses and Langres, or mild natural rinds like St. Nectaire.

    New World Pinot: More sugary, with jam-like fruit, dried cherries, oak, and spice.
    Pair with: Full, fatty flavors. Alpines, cheddars, and Manchego.

     

  • Riesling

    This food-friendly wine ranges from super sweet to quite dry. Acidity, minerality, and aromas of tropical fruit are almost always present.

    Dry: Characterized by bracing acidity and stark minerality. Tropical fruit on the nose, stunningly balanced flavor overall.
    Pair with: This versatile wine works equally well with a fresh chevre (bringing out acidity) as it does a stinky Alsatian Munster (playing up the sweet/salty contrast).

    Sweet: The other end of the spectrum offers a cloyingly sweet, syrupy wine. Aromas of ripe peaches and tropical fruit dominate, along with floral, perfumed accents.
    Pair with: With something this strong it’s best to contrast the sweetness with something funky or salty: A pungent washed rind like Grayson or a punchy blue like Bleu du Bocage.

     

  • Strong Beers

    Barleywine, Old Ale, Strong Ale, Scotch Ale

    Big and intense, with an alcohol punch to match, don’t underestimate any of these guys. Flavors will favor the malty side of the spectrum, with dark fruit, leather, and tobacco notes common. You will taste the booze. And it will be delicious.
    Pair with: A cheese equally big in flavor. Dunbarton Blue has subtle bluing and a savory-sweet gouda flavor that will be a perfect match for these tough brews.

Reviews
Cashel Blue zoom