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Consider Bardwell Farm
Manchester

$31.99/LB
This is one feisty goat! Straddling the border between NY and VT, Consider Bardwell Farm gives New England locavores a special treat with their Manchester, signature raw goats milk cheese. Regular brine washing leads to a pungent kick in the firm, flaking paste. We finish it in our own caves to encourage a bite on the finish. For a little extra punch, try pairing with ciders, both fresh and hard.

Just the facts

Country USA
Region Vermont
Maker Consider Bardwell Farm
Milk Type Goat
Pasteurization Unpasteurized
Rennet Type Microbial
Age 2-3 months
Cheese Type Swiss and Nutty
Pairing Recommendations

Pour a glass of...

  • Wheat Beers

    Wheat Beer, Weisse, Hefeweizen, Wit

    Wheat Beer, Weisse, Hefeweizen, Wit
    Pair with: Bright, tangy goat’s milk cheeses like Westfield Capri and buttery bloomy rinds like Nettle Meadow Kunik.

  • Pinot Noir

    Lighter bodied and delicate. Old World style generally offers more funk, New World more fruit.

    Old World Pinot: Flavors of fresh cherries and raspberry balanced by a barnyard funk and high minerality. Sometimes has floral aromas, reminiscent of rose petal.
    Pair with: Almost anything! Works with funky Frenchies Epoisses and Langres, or mild natural rinds like St. Nectaire.

    New World Pinot: More sugary, with jam-like fruit, dried cherries, oak, and spice.
    Pair with: Full, fatty flavors. Alpines, cheddars, and Manchego.

     

  • Riesling

    This food-friendly wine ranges from super sweet to quite dry. Acidity, minerality, and aromas of tropical fruit are almost always present.

    Dry: Characterized by bracing acidity and stark minerality. Tropical fruit on the nose, stunningly balanced flavor overall.
    Pair with: This versatile wine works equally well with a fresh chevre (bringing out acidity) as it does a stinky Alsatian Munster (playing up the sweet/salty contrast).

    Sweet: The other end of the spectrum offers a cloyingly sweet, syrupy wine. Aromas of ripe peaches and tropical fruit dominate, along with floral, perfumed accents.
    Pair with: With something this strong it’s best to contrast the sweetness with something funky or salty: A pungent washed rind like Grayson or a punchy blue like Bleu du Bocage.

     

  • Cider

    Brie and apples, cheddar and apples – both delicious! Why not extend that deliciousness to apples in liquid form? Enjoy cider and cheese for a pairing to remember.

    English style: drier, more like a beer, with nice acidity.
    Pair with: : Just about anything but we love it with firm natural rind cheese, like Landaff.

    Basque/Normandy : barnyardy and funky, but still with a little sweetness.
    Pair with: A beefy washed rind, like Grayson or Hudson Red to contrast the sugar and bring out the funk.

     

    American Cider: often, but not always on the sweeter side.
    Pair with: Sweet and earthy Bleumont Bandaged Cheddar or malty Bleu d’Auvergne.

Meet The Maker

Founded in 1864 by Consider Stebbins Bardwell, this 300-acre farm was Vermont’s first cheesemaking coop. Now, more than 100 years later, Angela Miller, Russell Glover, and Chris Gray are continuing the tradition, making cheese by hand using milk from their herd of 100 Oberhaslis goats, and from cows at neighboring partner farms. All of the milk used to make their small batches of cheese is free of antibiotics and hormones, and animals graze on pesticide- and fertilizer-free pastures that straddle Vermont’s Champlain Valley and Washington County, New York. The farm recently joined the USDA Grassland Reserve Program, which is a voluntary conservation membership that emphasizes biodiversity of local flora and fauna. Diverse diets help the cows and goats produce sweet and flavorful milk, which means tasty cheese for all of us!

Reviews
Cave Aged Manchester zoom