Chevre D'Argental

$22.99/Lb


D'argental is a relatively new innovation by the French fromage industry, as evidenced by its tidy, hexagonal shape - employed no doubt to set it apart from more conventional brie types. The unconventional aspect is the milk - pure, pasteurized goat. Centuries of experience have paid off in this case. The white, corrugated rind is uncommonly supple and tender. Not only does it avoid interfering with the luscious, whipped-to-runny texture of the interior, it actually adds an interesting texture contrast. With a sweet, gentle profile like this, stick with a light bodied, crisp white like Chenin Blanc.


Just the Facts

Country
France
Region
Rhône-Alpes
Milk Type
Goat
Pasteurization
Pasteurized
Rennet Type
Microbial
Age
3 weeks

Pour a glass of...
  • Cider

    Brie and apples, cheddar and apples – both delicious! Why not extend that deliciousness to apples in liquid form? Enjoy cider and cheese for a pairing to remember.

    English style: drier, more like a beer, with nice acidity.

    Pair with: Just about anything but we love it with firm natural rind cheese, like Landaff.



    Basque/Normandy : barnyardy and funky, but still with a little sweetness.

    Pair with: A beefy washed rind, like Grayson to contrast the sugar and bring out the funk.



    American Cider: often, but not always on the sweeter side.

    Pair with: Sweet and earthy Bleu Mont Bandaged Cheddar or malty Bleu d’Auvergne.

  • Farmhouse Ales & Sours

    Farmhouse, Saison, Bière de Garde, Lambic, Sour Beer

    Farmhouse ales, instead of being driven by malt or hops, depend on the yeast for their distinctive spicy, floral, and tart flavors. Commonly made by brewers in France and Belgium, farmhouse ales are usually light in color and body and quite effervescent. From time to time, brewers allow wild yeasts to ferment the beer, resulting in a brew that falls somewhere in between pleasantly bright to bracingly sour.

    Pair with: Mushroomy Brie Fermier or funky, bacony Epoisses are matches made in heaven.



  • Pinot Noir

    Lighter bodied and delicate. Old World style generally offers more funk, New World more fruit.

    Old World Pinot: Flavors of fresh cherries and raspberry balanced by a barnyard funk and high minerality. Sometimes has floral aromas, reminiscent of rose petal.

    Pair with: Almost anything! Works with funky Frenchies Epoisses and Langres, or mild natural rinds like Tomme de Savoie.

    New World Pinot: More sugary, with jam-like fruit, dried cherries, oak, and spice.

    Pair with: Full, fatty flavors. Alpines, cheddars, and Manchego.