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  • Vermont Creamery Small Goat Log 4 oz

Vermont Creamery Small Goat Log 4 oz

$5.99/Each


This is the cheese that started it all for Vermont Creamery. 25 year history and a slow, authentic process make this chevre stand out. First, milk is collected from small, local farms in Vermont. Fermentation is allowed to last a full 24 hours to make a cheese that is incredibly creamy and another day's draining to set it to perfection. Once it's been aged, this bright and creamy log is makes a versatile ingredient or compliment to any cheeseboard it graces. Cut into this pristine log while you pour a glass of Pinot Grigio, and fresh, lactic flavors and crisp notes of the wine will combine into a distinct harmony of flavors unique to Vermont.


Just the Facts

Country
United States
Region
Vermont
Milk Type
Goat
Pasteurization
Pasteurized
Rennet Type
Microbial
Age
2 weeks
Weight
4 oz

Pour a glass of...
  • Chardonnay

    This wine is all over the map – literally! Flavor varies widely depending on where and how it’s made.

    Old World Chardonnay: crisp and minerally, with flavors of apples and roasted pears.

    Pair with: Fresh or bloomy rind cheese, like Delice de Bourgogne



    New World Chardonnay (USA, warmer climates): richly buttery and oaky, heavy notes of vanilla, brown butter, and tropical fruits.

    Pair with: Slightly stronger cheese like sweet Tickler cheddar, or a mild washed rind.



    Oxidized Chardonnay: When Chardonnay is intentionally exposed to air it is “oxidized.” Common in the Jura mountain region, this wine is almost sherry-like with spicy, nutty flavors.

    Pair with: Play up the bolder flavors with a more complex or funky cheese. Almost any Alpine cheese, like Comte, or earthy aged goat cheese like Chevrot make a great match.

  • Lagers and Kolsch

    Lager, Dunkel, Schwarz, Pilsner, Kolsch Ale

    Lagers run the gamut from crisp, pale Pilsners to dark-malted Dunkels and Märzens. Flavors are typically approachable and mellow, a delicate balance of toasted bread, gentle sweetness, and mild hop bitterness for structure.

    Pair with: Almost any firm, mild cheese like Tomme de Savoie or Landaff Creamery Landaff.



  • Riesling

    This food-friendly wine ranges from super sweet to quite dry. Acidity, minerality, and aromas of tropical fruit are almost always present.

    Dry: Characterized by bracing acidity and stark minerality. Tropical fruit on the nose, stunningly balanced flavor overall.

    Pair with: This versatile wine works equally well with a fresh chevre (bringing out acidity) as it does a stinker like Willoughby (playing up the sweet/salty contrast).



    Sweet: The other end of the spectrum offers a cloyingly sweet, syrupy wine. Aromas of ripe peaches and tropical fruit dominate, along with floral, perfumed accents.

    Pair with: With something this strong it’s best to contrast the sweetness with something funky or salty: A pungent washed rind like Grayson or a punchy blue like Bleu du Bocage.

  • Rosé

    We love them all! Everything from light, crisp Provence style to deep and fruity Spanish Rosados. Don’t be afraid to enjoy rosé year-round, but we like the summer staple best with refreshing, mild cheeses that are great in warm weather.

    Pair with: Young chevres like Coupole and bloomy rinds like Moses Sleeper for the lighter stuff. A darker, fruitier rosé can stand up to a heavier cheese like nutty Pecorino Oro Antico. Sparkling rosé is a perfect match for Nettle Meadow Kunik.