Young Goat Gouda

$20.99/Lb


This Gouda will surprise friends and please even the pickiest cheese eater. This young goat's milk gouda is a semi-firm wheel of mild, vaguely sweet, and refreshingly straightforward cheese. This is not the chalky, distinctly goaty chevre that most people associate goat's milk with - instead, it hints at notes of butterscotch and caramel with only the mildest tanginess. The paste remains supple after approximately four months of aging, and can be easily melted over pies or crisps for an unusual dessert. This Dutch pale beauty prefers a malty Amber Ale or a buttery Chardonnay, or even with a dab of tart sour cherry preserves.


Just the Facts

Country
The Netherlands
Milk Type
Goat
Pasteurization
Pasteurized
Rennet Type
Animal
Age
2-4 months

Pour a glass of...
  • Chardonnay

    This wine is all over the map – literally! Flavor varies widely depending on where and how it’s made.

    Old World Chardonnay: crisp and minerally, with flavors of apples and roasted pears.

    Pair with: Fresh or bloomy rind cheese, like Delice de Bourgogne



    New World Chardonnay (USA, warmer climates): richly buttery and oaky, heavy notes of vanilla, brown butter, and tropical fruits.

    Pair with: Slightly stronger cheese like sweet Tickler cheddar, or a mild washed rind.



    Oxidized Chardonnay: When Chardonnay is intentionally exposed to air it is “oxidized.” Common in the Jura mountain region, this wine is almost sherry-like with spicy, nutty flavors.

    Pair with: Play up the bolder flavors with a more complex or funky cheese. Almost any Alpine cheese, like Comte, or earthy aged goat cheese like Chevrot make a great match.

  • Chenin Blanc

    Crisp and acidic with light minerality. You may smell stone fruit, apples, pear, quince, even some fresh herbs.

    Pair with: Tangy Loire Valley goat cheese to bring out crisp, mineral qualities in both. Something like Selles-sur-Cher will work perfectly!



  • Lagers and Kolsch

    Lager, Dunkel, Schwarz, Pilsner, Kolsch Ale

    Lagers run the gamut from crisp, pale Pilsners to dark-malted Dunkels and Märzens. Flavors are typically approachable and mellow, a delicate balance of toasted bread, gentle sweetness, and mild hop bitterness for structure.

    Pair with: Almost any firm, mild cheese like Tomme de Savoie or Landaff Creamery Landaff.



  • Riesling

    This food-friendly wine ranges from super sweet to quite dry. Acidity, minerality, and aromas of tropical fruit are almost always present.

    Dry: Characterized by bracing acidity and stark minerality. Tropical fruit on the nose, stunningly balanced flavor overall.

    Pair with: This versatile wine works equally well with a fresh chevre (bringing out acidity) as it does a stinker like Willoughby (playing up the sweet/salty contrast).



    Sweet: The other end of the spectrum offers a cloyingly sweet, syrupy wine. Aromas of ripe peaches and tropical fruit dominate, along with floral, perfumed accents.

    Pair with: With something this strong it’s best to contrast the sweetness with something funky or salty: A pungent washed rind like Grayson or a punchy blue like Bleu du Bocage.