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  1. New Mystic, Melville Quick View

    Mystic, Melville

    Melville is a brand new cheese, from a brand new cheesemaking operation in Mystic, Connecticut, and we’re excited about it. Here’s why you should be, too: a white whale, it’s the rare American super-fresh Stracchino cheese, inspired by the Northern Italian style, which is all about smoothness, pliability and awesome meltability. Melville’s namesake is Herman Melville—homage to the texture of the soft, luxuriously buttery square of cow’s milk cheese. It’s a supple, silky “singularly fatty globule of pure deliciousness,” and a mere few weeks old. It’s a revelation with sweet tomatoes, or atop pizza and pasta, a bottle of Champagne highly recommended. Read More
  2. New Hamden Quick View


    Named for the next hamlet over from Vulto creamery in Walton, NY, Hamden is cheese gone wild. Its birth story: cheesemaker Jos Vulto took a few wheels from their Ouleout batch and let them free to develop their own natural rind. Lo and behold: a rich diversity of molds and yeasts on the rind for plenty of earthy crunch. Its semi-soft paste tastes of the valley in spring—fresh milk, just-cut grass, hay. Hamden is Tomme de Savoie’s Hudson Valley soul sister. It begs for farmhouse ale, a crusty baguette, and ripe stone fruit. Jos Vulto left his career as a metal-worker to follow the siren-call of cheesemaking. He started out in his Brooklyn apartment, crafting cheese in his kitchen and aging his wheels beneath the sidewalk. In 2012, he opened a real-deal operation in New York’s western Catskills. We’re happy he did. He sources milk his neighbor, farmer Dan Finn’s herd of Holstein and Jersey cows and makes raw milk beauties full of charisma and depth. Read More
  3. New Chevrotin Quick View


    Seal Cove Farm’s rounds of grana-style goat’s milk goodness are bright and briny, just like the creamery’s namesake, even if they’re made (just a bit) inland. They are brined and aged for more than two months for a crumbly texture and a wallop of sweet, just-a-bit floral, yogurty flavor. It’s a perfect texture for crumbling over pasta or roasted veggies, or snacking on beside a crisp cider or a minerally Riesling. Seal Cove Farm began in 1976 in Lamoine, Maine with a pair of impressive dairy goats. “Each spring, we enjoy watching the newborn baby goats frolic with their mothers, knowing that with a happy life on our farm, these goats will create better tasting milk for our cheeses,” they say. Happy goats, happy cheese. Read More
  4. Ouleout Quick View

    Vulto Creamery

    Ouleout is named after a creek which flows through Delaware County, where Vulto Creamery is located. Ouleout is an Algonquin name meaning "a continuing voice." A raw milk, grass-fed cow's milk round in the vein of Ardrahan and Munster, Ouleout is medicinal and briny, with strong notes of roasted coffee. Read More
  5. Cave Aged Project X Quick View

    Project X

    From the hidden laboratories deep within Murray’s Caves, our newest experiment emerges: Project X! A collaboration with Spring Brook farm in Vermont, this raw cow’s milk tomme takes its inspiration from the rugged mountain cheeses of Italy, with our own Northeast twist. We coat these wheels with a generous helping of herbaceous fennel pollen, followed by repeated bathing in Gewurztraminer from New York’s Finger Lakes. The result is incredible: lusciously moist, with flavors of roasted walnuts, cocoa and anise. Equally at home on a cheese board or melted in pasta, with a glass of Alpine-style white wine. Read More
  6. Classic Blue Logs Quick View

    Classic Blue Logs

    Each piece of snowy, lightly aged chevre is hidden beneath a brillant blue blanket of pencillum roquefortii mold. The result is an immediate tang, but no residual blue flavors: simply dense, cakey, tart goat cheese that coats the mouth with a pleasant lactic taste. The Roquefort mold is mixed into the milk along with salt, and left to develop in a cool cave for approximately three weeks. The cheese does not develop blue veining because the paste is not pierced in any way; the mold, of course, can only develop when exposed to oxygen, hence the distinctive exterior. Read More
  7. St. Stephen Quick View

    Four Fat Fowl
    St. Stephen

    Hudson Valley creamery, Four Fat Fowl, took its name from a colonial rental fee charged by the last landlord of Rensselaerswyck (what’s now Rensselaer county”), which amounted to a day’s labor, including ten to twenty bushels of wheat. Their small, bloomy rounds are delicately buttery, with hints of sun-dried wheat and sweet cream beneath its pillowy rind, making St. Stephen a true expression of local terroir. Serve with local, NY honey, fresh berries and something bubbly to drink. Read More
  8. Miranda Quick View

    Vulto Creamery

    A tribute like no other, this Absinthe-washed masterpiece is named for cheese-maker Jos Vulto’s late wife who wished to have a cheese named after her. Made with raw cow’s milk at his creamery in the Catskills and washed in a locally produced Absinthe called Meadow of Love, the light orange rind imparts bright herbaceouness to the lightly bubbled, savory interior. The cheese’s meaty paste complements a pairing of smoky speck and tangy pickles. Read More

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