Roquefort

$34.00/Lb


Milk from Lacaune sheep is transformed into cheese and aged in the Combalou caves of Roquefort-sur-Soulzon to create the eponymous classic Roquefort cheese, a king among blues. For centuries, the cheese has been made in the small, southern French village, where its name and production methods have been protected since 1411. The creamy paste gives way to a spicy, peppery bite and earthy undertones thanks to the blue mold that penetrates the cheese. Contrast the savory richness of this cheese with a bright and tart pairing of Blenheim Apricots.

Unless noted otherwise, Murray's cheeses sold by the lb. ship in multiple 0.5 lb increments. To request a whole wheel, or an intact portion of at least 2 lb, please contact the Murray’s team at orders@murrrayscheese.com at least 72 hours prior to the date of shipment.


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Just the Facts

Country
France
Region
Occintanie
Milk Type
Sheep
Pasteurization
Raw
Rennet Type
Animal
Age
3 Months

Pour a glass of...
  • Bourbon

    Think: Caramelly, crystalline cheeses have the strength to stand up to bolder booze. With sweet bourbon, these cheeses become almost like dessert.
  • Porters and Stouts

    Porter, Stout, Imperial Stout

    Welcome to the dark side of beer. Porters and Stouts are born of heavily roasted malted barley, which colors the beer and develops toasty flavors recalling chocolate, coffee, and chicory. Looks can be deceiving, though: dark doesn’t always mean strong. Porters and stouts can be incredibly light in body, or big boozy affairs that pour like syrup.
    Pair with: A mild, creamy blue like Cambozola Black.

  • Riesling

    This food-friendly wine ranges from super sweet to quite dry. Acidity, minerality, and aromas of tropical fruit are almost always present.

    Dry: Characterized by bracing acidity and stark minerality. Tropical fruit on the nose, stunningly balanced flavor overall.
    Pair with: This versatile wine works equally well with a fresh chevre (bringing out acidity) as it does a stinker like Willoughby (playing up the sweet/salty contrast).


    Sweet: The other end of the spectrum offers a cloyingly sweet, syrupy wine. Aromas of ripe peaches and tropical fruit dominate, along with floral, perfumed accents.
    Pair with: With something this strong it’s best to contrast the sweetness with something funky or salty: A pungent washed rind like Grayson or a punchy blue like Bleu du Bocage.