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Le Famiglie Di Formaggi

Le Famiglie Di Formaggi

Le Famiglie Di Formaggi

Le Famiglie Di Formaggi

Italian culture places a strong emphasis on family, so all month we’ll be looking at the various families of Italian cheese. Every week we will highlight a different category, with special sale prices on the cheeses in that family.

Grana: Grana cheese is grainy, hence the name. Cheese that develops a grain does so through the aging process, suggesting that these are particularly hard cheeses. Indeed, Grana cheeses are known for their ability to grate. The best known examples are Grana Padano and, of course, Parmigiano Reggiano, Italy’s King of Cheeses.

Fresh: As the name suggests, fresh cheese is any type that has not been aged or processed. This usually means it is soft, spreadable, and creamy. For a stateside reference, think cream cheese and cottage cheese. In Italy, the most common styles of fresh cheese are ricotta, mascarpone, and certain styles of robiola and pasta filata, all of which are often smeared over fresh bread and can often be found in popular Italian desserts like cheesecake and cannoli.

Pasta Filata: In English, we call this style ‘stretched curd,’ but it’s a technique that’s purely Italian. To give the cheese its trademark texture, the curd is bathed in hot whey for several hours, making it nice and pliant. It’s then kneaded to obtain a soft, elastic texture and typically turned into fresh cheese, like mozzarella. Fun fact: in Italy, ‘mozzarella’ refers to the buffalo milk variety. What we call mozzarella, they call fior di latte.

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