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Brittany

If you look at a map of the world, you’ll see a little nub on the northwest coast of France, pointing across the Atlantic at Newfoundland. That peninsula is the region of Brittany, known for its world-renowned oysters and some of the oldest architecture still standing (we’re talking monuments and megaliths built 7,000 years ago). While most of France is wine-centric, Brittany’s go-to drink is cider. So if you’re looking to pair the right beverage with your Breton cheese, think apple over grape.Click On The Map to French Regional Favorites

Cheese from Brittany includes: Curé Nantais, Abbaye de Timadeuc, Joie de Notre Dame
Pays De La Loire

Pays De La Loire

Pays de la Loire is what you see of France in your mind’s eye: rolling pasture, verdant fields, and majestic castles dotting the riverbanks. It is also the birthplace of beurre blanc and the rillete. You may think that a region known for both a butter sauce and a preparation of potted meat might make some seriously good cheese. You’d be right.Click On The Map to Shop French Regional Favorites.

Cheese from Pays de la Loire: Beurre Charentes Poitou, Saint-Paulin, Pont L’eveque
Provence-Alpes-Cote D'Azur

Provence-Alpes-Cote D'Azur

Nice. Marseille. Cannes. Monaco even, in that strange way that Monaco is kind of French but not really. Point is: Provence-Alpes-Côte D’Azur is known the world over for its waters that are so distinctive there’s a shade of blue with its name. But it also produces cheeses that happily hold their own against any of the big name style from further north.Click On The Map to Shop Cheeses from Provence-Alpes-Cote D'Azur

Cheese from Provence-Alpes-Côte D’Azur includes: Banon, La Brousse Du Rove
Corsica

Corsica

Corsica: Birthplace of Napoleon, island of olives and chestnuts. All Corsican cheese is made of either sheep or goat milk, and the trademark style is called Brocciu, often considered to be the most representative food of the entire island. It is like a richer, lactose-free version of Ricotta, and is ubiquitous in Corsican cuisine.Click On The Map to Shop French Regional Favorites

Cheese from Corsica includes: Brocciu, Tomme de Brebis, Tomme de Chevre